It’s all about survival

It’s been seven days since we arrived in the Middle Kingdom. It still doesn’t feel quite real that we’re in another country. It’s easy to forget that you’re in China. In a much shorter amount of time than I anticipated, I’m used to the sounds of China – the sharp Mandarin language, horns beeping all the time, the general business of a city.

We’ve located the local cafes both on and off campus – 1897, Grandma’s, Panini and Gecko to name a few. We’ve survived our first party on Saturday night, and even made it through our first day of classes.

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Delicious honey, lemon and rose tea at Gecko Cafe

I feel like the first week here has been all about taking risks and making it through. We took the bullet train to Shanghai. Kay set up a Taobao account so we can buy internet. We negotiated mobile phone contracts, taxi prices and some people have even bought bikes. The limbo of waiting for class to start has ended today, as we begin our first real week of timetables and learning.

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Welcoming ceremony for International Students

I’ve now got more tea in my room than I know what to do with. I’ve also discovered a love for Innisfree cosmetics and I’m slowly getting used to the haze that hangs around the city (pro tip – it’s easier if you just tell yourself it’s a lovely morning mist).

Today we had our first class. It was just an orientation with our teacher so we could meet our classmates. My class has 22 people in it, and they seem very friendly (we’ve already got a WeChat group). I’ve sort of worked out which textbooks are for which classes, which is more difficult than you’d think – they hand you a stack of seven textbooks, all the titles are in Mandarin, you have to work out which class they align to.

For the first time on Saturday we visited Hefangjie, one of the local marketplaces. Everyone bought little waving cat keyrings with our Chinese names engraved on them, to hang in our rooms. We went into a tea shop because Kay and I wanted some longjing green tea (a local specialty which is grown in Hangzhou), and ended up having a full morning tea with the shopkeeper.

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My waving cat keyring
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So much tea, so little time

One thing that consistently surprises me about China is how many people smoke. In Australia it’s unusual to see someone smoking, in China it’s unusual if you don’t smoke. It’s legal to smoke inside bars and clubs, so everywhere you enter has a haze of smoke. As if the air you breathe isn’t already bad enough, add a constant haze of cigarette smoke to it and it gets even worse. On the upside, it’s frowned upon to smoke in cafes and restaurants so people generally don’t.

Overall the first week has been quite nice. I’m getting used to dorm life and the millions of steps that you have to go through to achieve anything in China. Everything is a constant negotiation and the simplest things, such as switching your bedsheets over, take four or five steps to do. Tomorrow is our first full day of class with all of our teachers, hopefully it goes well!

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